Next prospective student tours for the 2017-18 school year will be on May 10, 17 and June 7 at 3pm. The 7th and 9th grades are still open, all other grades have spots available on waitlist.  Metro Arts is an "A" rated school!   

Metropolitan Arts Institute

Academics » High School Course Descriptions

High School Course Descriptions


Metropolitan Arts Institute High School Academic Curriculum

 

 

 

Math Course Descriptions

Four years of math are required. We offer Honors options in all math classes.

 

 

Algebra 1: Linear Functions and Discrete Mathematics 

 

The goal of this course is to provide students with the core algebra skills necessary to pass the algebraic portion of the Arizona AIMS standardized test.  Semester 1 will focus on computational fluency, number sense, variable expressions, linear equations and inequalities, and graphing.  Semester 2 will focus on linear systems, combinatorial theory, probability, and statistics.  Students will learn definitions by using them and achieve mastery over new methods through rigorous practice.  Students will use graphing calculators to explore functions that model real world scenarios.  Throughout the course, students will use algebraic methods to model real world scenarios about numerical patterns, movement, and rate of change.  Students will collect their own real-world data and model it with an appropriate mathematical function. 

 

Geometry: Measurement of Space 

 

The goal of this course is to provide students with the core geometry skills necessary to pass the geometric portion of the Arizona AIMS standardized test.  Semester One will focus on measurement, area of 2D figures, volume of 3D solids, coordinate geometry, transformations in the plane, angles, and line relationships.  Semester Two will focus on triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circle theorems, and similarity theorems.  Students will learn definitions by using them and achieve mastery over new methods through rigorous practice.  Students will use graphing calculators to explore graph transformations and perimeter/area/volume properties of geometric figures.   Throughout the course, students will use geometric methods to model real world scenarios about area, volume, density, and rate of change. 

(Prerequisite: Algebra I)

 

Algebra 2: Functions and their Application 

 

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding and proficiency of functions. Semester One will focus on a review of fundamental algebraic techniques, quadratic functions and rational functions. Semester Two will focus on polynomial functions, conic sections, sequences and series.  Students will use graphing calculators on a regular basis as an integral part of learning which will help students to advance as they visualize the mathematic concepts covered in class. As a class, we will weave fundamental theory with real-life applications so that students will understand how advanced mathematics will apply to their lives outside of the classroom. (Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry)

 

Pre-calculus:  With Physical Application

 

The goal of this course is to prepare students to enroll in college level mathematics, including calculus.  Semester 1 will focus on using functions to model real world scenarios: students will use polynomial functions to study physics topics such as distance, velocity, and accelerations; students will use exponential functions to model scenarios involving exponential growth and decay.  Semester 2 will focus on using trigonometric functions to model periodic real world scenarios, such as tides, planetary orbits, sunrise data, and other naturally occurring phenomena.  Students will also study an introduction to calculus topics such as limits, derivatives, and integrals.  Students will learn definitions by using them to achieve mastery over new methods through rigorous practice.  Students will use graphing calculators to explore graph transformations of functions.  Throughout the course, students will use algebraic methods to model real world scenarios about rate of change.  (Prerequisites: Algebra 1, 2 and Geometry)

 

Physics   (This course has significant math content and can satisfy a 4th year math credit, not offered every year)

 

The goal of this course is to understand and apply the scientific process, as well as to understand the physical processes of the universe and how they apply to our daily lives. Students will be able to apply mathematics in order to use formulas and equations to explain natural phenomena. In order to practice these concepts, students will complete assignments, conduct prepared laboratory activities, design and conduct their own experiments and demonstrate this knowledge on examinations. During Semester 1, we will focus on forces and motion; forces in fluids; work, power, and machines; energy; and thermal energy and heat. During Semester 2, we will focus on mechanical waves and sound, the electromagnetic spectrum, electricity, and magnetism, and nuclear physics. During both semesters, we will apply the general physical concepts we learn in class to astronomical observations and phenomena. (Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or Algebra 2 with instructor permission) 

 

Financial Math (12th grade)

 

The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how money is a tool and its use must be planned carefully in order to achieve life goals. Generally, students will explore the various ways in which money is made, spent and invested. Specifically, students will create financial goals, construct a budget, and actively research and experience the workings of a variety of financial tools and products: budgets, checking accounts, savings accounts, taxes, insurance, credit cards, loans, interest payments, investing, IRA's, stocks and bonds, and the power of compound interest. Students will complete a unit on the importance of probability and statistics in decision making in real life situations. Students will engage with the material by: participating in classroom discussions, reading the textbook, and researching financial products outside of class. Instruction will be supplemented with lectures and presentations from various financial professionals. (Prerequisites: Algebra 1, 2 and Geometry)

 

 

Science Course Descriptions

Three years of science are required. We offer Honors options in Biology, Anatomy/Physiology and Environmental Science.

 

Biology 9th

 

The goal of this course is to generate a biological understanding of life by focusing on the characteristics of living things, the diversity of life and how organisms and populations change over time in terms of biological adaptation and genetics. Throughout the year this course provides an opportunity for students to develop scientific process skills, laboratory techniques, and an understanding of the fundamental principles of living organisms. Semester 1 will focus on the science of biology, the chemistry of life, cellular structure and function, cellular growth and division, DNA and RNA, transcription, protein synthesis, genetics, meiosis and human heredity. Semester 2 will focus primarily on Darwin’s theory of evolution, evolution of populations, the history of life, classification of living things, the biosphere, ecosystems and communities, populations, human evolution, primatology and humans in the biosphere.

 

 

Chemistry 10th

 

The goal of this course is to build a foundation of scientific reasoning and methodology that will be used throughout students’ academic careers by educating students in the central science of chemistry. Students will learn about atomic theory, how atoms and molecules interact, properties of matter (on macroscopic and atomic levels), and chemical reactions, all while using laboratory experiments to develop skills in data collection, analysis and presentation. By the end of this course, students will understand that science is not just a class that is required for graduation, but a discipline that encompasses every aspect of our lives. Semester 1 will focus on scientific skills, the scientific method, scientific measurement and conversions, properties of matter, states of matter, atomic structure and the periodic table. Semester 2 will focus on chemical nomenclature,  chemical bonding,  chemical reactions and stoichiometry, solutions, acids and bases ,and a brief introduction to nuclear chemistry. 

 

Anatomy/Physiology 11th (Course replaced with Environmental Science as of  2017-2018)

 

The goal of this course is to examine the human body on both a microscopic and macroscopic scale. The structure and form of the human body (anatomy) will be examined, but emphasis is placed on the integrated functioning parts and how these parts adjust to changing environmental conditions and biological needs (physiology). This is a college preparatory course which involves biology, chemistry and physics. Students will be asked to think critically, learn medical terms and answer and discuss actual clinical cases. There is also a strong laboratory component to this course that involves microscopic analysis, as well as a number of dissections. This course will be of particular interest to those who are interested in a health science career. Semester 1 will focus primarily on homeostasis, cellular structure and function, the nervous system and the skeletal system. Semester 2 will cover the muscular system, integumentary system, digestive system, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, reproductive system, human diseases and addictions and the immune system. (Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry)

 

Sustainability and Regenerative Design (Course not offered every year)

 

A survey of ecological challenges and the theories and design based methods used to address those challenges.This class will cover Systems Theory, sustainable design principles and ethics, and sustainable agriculture as well as other topics in sustainability. Class will feature lab components and design opportunities.  (Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry)

 

Human Evolutionary Biology (previously Physical Anthropology) (Course no longer offered)

 

This is the study of human biology within the framework of evolution. In this class, students will investigate human biology through the study of genetics, inheritance, population biology and the principles of evolution. As humans are classified within the Order Primates, students will also study the evolution, ecology and behavior of our closest living relatives: prosimians, monkeys and apes. Considerable time will also be spent examining the fossil record of the human lineage, starting in the Miocene and concluding with the emergence of anatomically modern human beings. Finally, we will investigate the significance of human adaptability and the various ways in which the human species has adapted to habitats around the world. This is a laboratory course and students will practice the experimental techniques characteristic to anthropology through a number of in-class and off-campus activities. (Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry)

 

 

Physics  (This course has significant math content and may also satisfy a 4th year math credit)

 

The goal of this course is to understand and apply the scientific process, learn about the scientific history of physics, as well as to understand the physical processes of the universe and how they apply to our daily lives. Students will be able to apply mathematics in order to use formulas and equations to explain natural phenomena. In order to practice these concepts, students will complete assignments, conduct prepared laboratory activities, design and conduct their own experiments and demonstrate this knowledge on examinations. During Semester 1, we will focus on forces and motion; forces in fluids; work, power, and machines; energy; and thermal energy and heat. During Semester 2, we will focus on mechanical waves and sound, the electromagnetic spectrum, electricity, and magnetism, and nuclear physics. During both semesters, we will apply the general physical concepts we learn in class to astronomical observations and phenomena. (Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or concurrently taking Pre-calculus)

 

 

 

 

Humanities Course Descriptions (English and Social Sciences)

Four years of humanities required. We offer Honors options in Humanities 9th-12th.

 

Humanities 9th

 

English Composition and Study Skills

The Humanities 9 course prepares students to study literature analytically through reading world literature with a focus on the different genres of literature (fiction and nonfiction, short stories, essays, articles, and speeches, poetry, drama and the novel). Students will be expected to master language and reading objectives for the Arizona standardized test.  In particular, students will demonstrate an understanding of language terms (capitalization, punctuation, grammar, usage and spelling) in the writing they will complete for this class. Students will write in a variety of modes, such as descriptive, narrative, expository and persuasive for different purposes and audiences.

 

Humanities 10th

 

English Composition & World History

The goal of this course is to experience human cultural production from its ancient beginnings through modern times.  Human cultural production can be understood as any expression of ideas and thoughts that help us understand struggle, achievement, virtue, love, anger, beauty, self, war, peace  and revolution.  These are just some of the concepts examined through literature, art, philosophy, music, theater and dance.  The initial objective will be to build a solid conceptual foundation through the western classics that will serve as a reference point for all future explorations of art and literature. The second objective for this course is to coherently connect ideas and expressions through different mediums and geographic spaces.  The approach to these objectives will require reading, writing, and discussion, along with an understanding of culture, history, geography and literature. Furthermore,  students will engage in discussion of ideas openly and frequently, using these ideas as springboards for writing.

 

Humanities 11th

 

English Literature & US History

This course is a survey of some of the broad historical themes and evolutionary trends in the history of the United States as examined through specific events and the lens of American literature. The first semester covers earlier literature and events through the 19th century. The second semester’s primary focus will be the 20th century. The goal of this course is to help students develop an understanding of American History and how that history presents itself through historical documents and American Literature. Students will analyze primary source documents, novels, short stories and poetry in order to develop a firm grasp of the American narrative. Students will be challenged to elevate their reading and writing skills through the creation of multiple essays in which they will use various research techniques, peer evaluation and teacher-guided discussions. 

 

Humanities 12th

 

English Literature & Economics, Arizona History & US Government

This year-long course is a survey of some of the broad themes associated with government and economics through the lens of historical documents and English Literature. Students will explore the structure of U.S. and Arizona government through constitutional analysis and landmark Supreme Court decisions. Students will learn to compare and contrast different forms of government from different perspectives. Students will also explore the realm of economics. Through the study of multiple forms of economy and various economic theories, students will demonstrate a working understanding of fundamental economics and its influence on society, politics and literature. The first semester will focus on English literature and government. The second semester will focus on English literature and economics. Students will also meet all of the standards for senior level writing and reading.

 

Poetry, Myth and Transformation

 

This class is a combination of four subjects: poetic writing, Jungian depth & transpersonal psychology, mythology and transformational studies. We will engage with poetic images, language and the myths we live by as well as explore our imaginal inner worlds. the nature of creativity and seek out the source of our inspiration.  Lastly, it is an investigation of our artistic responsibility to use our inspiration and creative abilities for the betterment of the world. Students will leave the course with a portfolio of poems, as well as a deeper familiarity with their inner creative resources. The goal of the course is to allow for the development of a solid mastery over the fundamental elements of the creative process, the maturation of the student's poetic voice and technique, and the growth of the student's knowledge and insight into their own creative self and the larger world. (Prerequisite: Instructor permission)

 

Psychology and Sociology 

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology. They will also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. 

 

Comparative World Religions/Western Philosophy (Course no longer offered)

 

This course will provide a clear and concise introduction to the religions of the world. Students will learn about the people, places, practices and philosophies that exist within the myriad of different religions and cultures that surround the globe. This class will clarify misconceptions and provide analysis from a purely academic point of view. Through study, lecture, and energetic discussion, students will explore the origins and impact of these many different religions on historical and modern thought. Through the varied lenses of many world religions, we will examine fundamental philosophical topics such as morality, ethics, the  role of government, the meaning of life and existence, and beauty in religious expression. Interwoven throughout the study of religion, we will examine the art, literature, poetry, and music of many religions and examine various cultures' perceptions of beauty. Students who are interested in this class should be mature and able to respectfully and objectively discuss many world views that may be vastly different to one’s own experience. Preference will be given to juniors and seniors. 

 

Study & Life Skills

 

This course provides the opportunity to develop important college readiness skills. These include learning how to study, what to study, how to organize materials and stay organized. It also helps each student work to overcome any real or perceived deficiencies in an academic subject and how to break larger projects into smaller parts and make progress. The life skills orient around learning to balance life, work, social and family commitments. The above skills are delivered on a one to one basis as needed and as issues and concerns arise from the rest of the curriculum. Students have access to a faculty member to receive direct mentoring in any or all of the above areas.

 

 

Writing Across the Curriculum (formerly Academic Writing)

 

This course will primarily focus on enhancing the written work of students from 9th to 12th grade.  Class will consist of lectures, discussions, in-class writing exercises, peer editing, and typing and revising final papers. Students will be expected to actively engage in the process of writing from idea to a final publishable paper.  Students will engage in self-evaluations, and will receive assignments meant to enhance vocabulary and grammar skills as well.  Finally, students will be expected to be reading novels and non-fiction works throughout the entire school year. This course will draw from the Arizona English Standards from grades 9-12. 

 

 

Foreign Language Course Descriptions

 

Spanish 1

 

The goal of this year long course is to develop a foundation in the Spanish language and knowledge of Hispanic culture though speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students will acquire a basic Spanish vocabulary that will enable them to relate information about themselves and everyday events using simple sentences and phrases. Students will also gain cultural awareness and sensitivity though exposure to the language and histories of various Hispanic populations around the world.

 

Spanish 2

 

Students in Spanish 2 continue to increase their ability in the language, building on the skills acquired in Spanish 1 and introducing more advanced structures in grammar and conversation. They will learn a more expanded vocabulary and improve their ability to function in the language.  Students are expected to read, write and understand simple texts in Spanish. They will learn to listen and respond in given contexts using the target language with appropriate intonation and pronunciation.  (Prerequisite: Spanish 1)

 

Spanish 3- Global Citizenship

 

Spanish III/Global Citizenship is an interactive, dynamic course designed to not only further students' knowledge of Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and speaking, but to bring into focus how studying a language prepares one to become a citizen of the world with a more global perspective on culture, current events and humanity. Spanish-speaking nations and regions will be explored through the film, art, dance, cuisine, music and travel. Students will have opportunities to practice their Spanish in context, while learning to dance Salsa and Merengue or cook Chilis en Nogada. Several times throughout the year students will take day trips to relevant festivals and art exhibits. (Prerequisites: Spanish 1 and 2 or Instructor permission)

 

 

Metropolitan Arts Institute High School Arts Curriculum

 

 

 

Visual Art Course Descriptions

 

2D/3D Design 

 

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the Elements and Principles of Design using both 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional techniques.   Each student should become familiar and comfortable with the Principles of Design, learning to incorporate them into all of their further visual art commitments.  Students will demonstrate competency by understanding and executing the following Elements and Principles of Design: Line, Shape, Form, Space, Size, Texture, Color, Value, Balance, Rhythm, Repetition, Unity, Variation, Movement and Pattern.   Students will create and identify these Design Elements in their own work, the work of their peers and that of historical artworks.  Students will critique their own work and that of their peers.   

 

Drawing - Beginning

 

The goal of this course is to understand the fundamental principles of drawing and gain the confidence to use them in the pursuit of creating visual art.  Students will be able to demonstrate competency by understanding and executing the 5 Basics of Drawing along with the Elements and Principles of Design. Students will focus on the creation of line variation and begin to develop their own mark. Methods and techniques mastered will include: gesture, contour, value, perspective, foreshortening and composition using a variety of materials. Students will begin to understand the history of drawing and its impact on society through a series of slide presentations and guest lecturers. Students will also be able to critique their own work, as well as the work of their peers.   This course will facilitate drawing as a foundation for all other art-making endeavors.   

 

Drawing - Advanced 

 

The goal of this course is for students to engage in advanced development of drawing skills and compositional theory.  There will be further study of drawing techniques with emphasis on individual problems using a wide variety of traditional and nontraditional materials. Students will be able to demonstrate competency by understanding and executing the techniques involved with the following: Spatial Relationships of the Art Elements learned in Beginning Drawing: Shape, Value, Line and Texture,  as well as color. Methods and techniques mastered include Gesture, Contour, Organizational Measurement, Perspective, Foreshortening and Composition. Students are introduced to Conceptual Drawing approaches using a wide variety of drawing tools. Students will begin to understand Art History and current artistic movements as well as contemporary art theory as it relates to drawing. Students will continue to gain knowledge in critiquing their own work as well as the work of others. (Prerequisite: Beginning Drawing)

 

Painting - Beginning & Advanced 

 

The goal of this course is to develop fundamental skills and understanding of painting techniques.  The history of painting and the social impact,  both in history and contemporary life, are discussed as part of visual art in context.  Students will demonstrate competency by understanding and executing the following techniques and methods: A La Prima, Glazing, Texture, Color, Value and Composition.  Students will paint from life and found visual source materials, and will begin to build a personal body of work that can form a portfolio for college admission.  Students will critique their own work and that of their peers.  (Prerequisite: Drawing or 2D/3D Design)

 

Life Drawing (11 & 12th grade only)

 

Students will develop skills and understanding of drawing through studying the human figure and drawing from life. Students will be able to demonstrate methods and techniques of drawing by studying the human form. Students will be able to demonstrate competency by understanding and executing the techniques involved with the following: Spatial Relationships of the Art Elements Learned in Drawing 1-2: Shape, Value, Line and Texture as well as Color. Methods and techniques mastered include: Gesture, Contour, Organizational Measurement, Perspective, Foreshortening, Portraiture, Figure Composition and the Figure in Context. The student’s own mark will be explored and celebrated. Students are required to submit 1 Artist review per quarter from a provided list. (Prerequisite: Drawing) (11th & 12th only)

 

Mixed Media - Beginning and Advanced 

 

Students will understand conceptual art and experiment with a variety of materials and concepts that will encourage the expression of ideas through an integration of a wide variety of media. Students will understand the history behind conceptual art and how it is used in Contemporary Art.  Students will be able to demonstrate competency by understanding and executing the techniques involved with the following: Spatial Relationships of the art elements learned in Drawing and 2-D/3-D. Methods and techniques mastered include Printmaking, Frottage, Collage, Assemblage and Book Arts using a wide variety of art-making tools. Students will begin to understand Art History and current artistic movements as well as Contemporary Art Theory as they relate to Mixed Media. Students will continue to gain knowledge in critiquing their own work as well as the work of others. Students are required to do an independent project consisting of an altered book that becomes their sketchbook/journal. (Prerequisite: Drawing or 2D/3D Design)

 

Printmaking

The goal of this course is to understand the fundamental basics of print media and to become a small part of print media's strong and everlasting history. Students will be able to demonstrate competency in the methods of dry point, intaglio, relief printing; stamp making, linoleum cutting, woodcutting, screen printing, appropriation and text based compositions. Students will use a variety of media including oil based inks, acrylic inks, chine-colle, blind embossment, found object printing, and so much more. Students will begin in intaglio for quarter 1, move into relief for quarter 2, and complete their 3rd quarter in screen printing. The final (4th) quarter will include a print exchange in which students will create an edition of prints large enough so that each student will receive one print from every classmate. Students will begin to understand the history of print media and its impact on society from Gutenberg to TeeFury. Students will be able to critique their own work, as well as the work of their peers. (Prerequisite: Beginning Drawing or 2D/3D Design) 

 

Print in Contemporary Craft

The goal of this course is to introduce printmaking techniques through craft in a variety of media. This is a studio art class intended for both the experienced and the novice artist. This class will be taught in quarter sections, each one focussing on craft in a certain area: paper, ceramics, metal, and fibers. The fundamental principle of printmaking is to make multiple impressions from a key image. We will be exploring the variety that can be achieved from these impressions in as many forms as possible.

 

Photo - Beginning

 

Students will be provided with the technical and conceptual tools to express original ideas through the photographic medium.  Students will express competency by understanding and executing the following techniques: identifying functions and properly using an adjustable 35mm camera, developing 35mm black and white film and creating black and white gelatin silver prints (both straight and manipulated).  Students will also be able to list, define, describe and demonstrate formal visual competency by identifying and utilizing the elements and principles of design as they relate to the photographic image.  

 

Photo - Advanced

 

Students will begin to master the communication of ideas through a photographic format at a higher level of craftsmanship, personal investigation and social context.  Students will address aesthetic concerns surrounding the production of a fine print and the presentation of the finished photograph.  In the area of conceptual and contextual issues surrounding photography, students will be able to exhibit competency by understanding how to identify and use contextual issues that surround the photographic image, the history of photography, how to define and talk about aesthetics and culture as it relates to photography, the impact photography has in our culture and how to talk about art through self-critique of others’ work. (Prerequisite: Beginning Photo)

 

 

Introduction to Art History: A survey course

 

This course is intended to introduce students to the History of Art, beginning with the ancient cave paintings in France and ending with the contemporary art of North America in the 20th century. As an academic elective, this course will encourage discussion, analysis and critical thinking. The use of digital images in a lecture environment will allow students to experience art across time in order to gain a better understanding of themselves as artists, and to learn about the cultural context surrounding each movement. The evaluation of each student will consist of one critical essay per quarter, with each student having the freedom to choose from a variety of topics that are being examined. Ultimately, this course is intended to supplement the learning in theHumanities and Visual Arts curriculum.

 

Book Publishing  (Course no longer offered)

 

Students will be provided with the technical skills of layout and book design as well as explore the different ways to record and substantiate journalistic information. In addition, students will be responsible for the creation of the Metro High School Yearbook and Junior High School Yearbook.

 

Performing Arts Course Descriptions

 

Theater

 

Theatre - Beginning

 

Students will be presented with an overall basic introduction to the performing art of theatre which encompasses not only acting, but also directing, playwriting, technical and artistic design.  The concepts that students learn will aide in creating a foundation for any branch of theatre a student chooses to pursue in future studies or endeavors. The goal of the course is to create, facilitate and nurture any strength a student possesses and to help in overcoming any weaknesses discovered throughout the educational experience. Upon completion of the course, the student will have become familiar with basic introductory knowledge needed for participation in a theatrical activity. 

 

Theatre - Advanced

 

Students will continue their basic theatre training with an advanced examination and practice of the performing art of theatre which encompasses not only acting, but also directing, playwriting, technical and artistic design.  The concepts that students learn will aide in furthering a foundation for any branch of theatre a student chooses to pursue in future studies or endeavors. The goal of the course is to continue to create, facilitate,and nurture any strength a student possesses and to help in overcoming any weaknesses discovered throughout the educational experience. Upon completion of the course, the student will have become familiar with an advanced acting, directing, playwriting and design technique.

 

Film 

 

Film - Beginning

 

This is a teamwork-based course built to enhance perception in the process of viewing films and to develop critical skills in evaluating and analyzing film as an art form.  Students will identify and use film terminology correctly, as well as identify some of the major figures who have made great contributions to contemporary cinema.  The class will learn to work on a video production by switching off roles in the pre-production, production and post-production departments.  They will also create a personal or group video project that will enhance their understanding of both the art form and themselves.

 

Film - Advanced

 

This course will hone in on individual projects and strengths.  Students will enhance their perception in the process of viewing films and develop critical skills in evaluating film as an art form.  They will learn to recognize and use film terminology correctly, as well as study some of the major figures who have made significant contributions to contemporary cinema.  Students will learn to work on a video production, switching off roles in the pre-production, production, and post-production departments and they will create at least one piece of work to be included in the students’ individual portfolios. (Prerequisite: Beginning Film)

 

Film Project: Production Techniques

This is a class in which single video projects will be produced by the entire class working together.  All stages of production will be done during class time, including rehearsing, shooting, and editing. The class will be divided up with each student responsible for a specific role in a stage of production.  Roles will be rotated throughout the year for each production.

 

 

Dance

 

Physical Express/Nutrition

 

This is a course for students interested in Physical Fitness and Nutrition. Studies emphasize Low & High Impact Aerobics, Yoga, Pilates Base and Health Nutrition. Students will learn to demonstrate knowledge of physical fitness terminology and basic knowledge of health nutrition.  They will reflect on personal progress through self-evaluation. Students will also begin to understand how basic neuromuscular functions work within their system.  

 

Beginning Dance

 

This is a course for students interested in dance and a possible career in the art form. Studies emphasized are modern, ballet, dance history and dance composition. Field trips and performance experiences are included in the curriculum.  Students will use correct body alignment and will learn proper dance techniques.  They will perform a variety of movement sequences in modern and ballet and will demonstrate knowledge of dance terminology and dance history.  

 

Advanced Dance

 

This is a course for students interested in dance and a possible career in the art form. Studies emphasized are advanced modern technique and composition.  This class will also include dance terminology, college and career opportunities, dance history, dance production and teaching techniques.  Field trips and performance experiences are included in curriculum. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of improvisational and choreographic techniques and be able to solve problems appropriately in individual and group choreography. (Prerequisite: Beginning Dance)

 

Repertory Dance /Pre-professional Ballet

 

This is a course for students interested in dance and a possible career in the art form. This course will also include the study of dance terminology, dance history and dance production.  Field trips and performance experiences are included in the curriculum.  Students will perform a variety of movement sequences in ballet and demonstrate knowledge of dance terminology and dance history related to ballet.  By the end of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to reflect on personal progress through self-evaluation and will be able to communicate effectively through dance and written work. (Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor)

 

 

Music

 

Guitar - Beginning & Advanced

 

This course is designed to give students an understanding of guitar technique and musical knowledge.  The student will learn to play bar chords, further develop note reading skills as well as listening techniques, giving the student a well-rounded approach to the discipline.  Through individual practice and group performance, a deeper understanding of the instrument and music will be achieved.  Students will need to bring their own guitar for this course.  

 

Vocals

 

In this course students will develop and demonstrate a basic understanding of healthy vocal technique encompassing posture, breath, phonation, interpretation, style and musicianship.  Students will gain an understanding of the physical, theoretical and historical underpinnings of vocal music that inform their choices as performers.  Students will perform ensemble pieces and solo vocal music in a variety of styles.  

 

Music Development and Production

 

This course will cover all aspects of the music creation process, from inspiration to the release and performance of original songs. The course will begin with the basics of music performance and writing, requiring students to create their own works. We will then build a foundational understanding of the science of sound before moving on to audio production and recording techniques, in which students will learn production software, engineering, MIDI, non-linear editing and mixing. Professional recording equipment will be available to work with to assist in the production of group and individual projects. 

 

 

*These courses are subject to change at any time.  Classes may or may not be offered on any given year based on student requests and/or faculty availability.